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FW: Stormwater Management Education & Public Outreach - Rain Garden info
Release Date: October 04, 2011

Free One-to-One Tutoring for the GED @ the Greenburgh Public Library

  • Date: Oct 5, 2011 | 5:30pm - 8:30pm
  • Place: Greenburgh Public Library, 300 Tarrytown Road, Elmsford, NY
  • Price: n/a

Need HELP with Math? Writing? Understanding what’s on the test? Free tutor assistance to help you prepare for your GED [High School Equivalency Exam] Contact: Robin Osborne, Westchester Library System, 231-3237 rosborne@wlsmail.org for further information.

 

From: Aaron Schmidt
Sent: Wednesday, September 28, 2011 2:38 PM
To: Paul Feiner
Subject: Stormwater Management Education & Public Outreach - Rain Garden info

 

Supervisor Feiner:

 

PLEASE SEND OUT THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION TO THE GBLIST, SO THAT WE CAN MEET OUR REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE MS4 – PHASE II STORMWATER EDUCATION AND OUTREACH PROGRAM…

 

 

As part of the requirements under the MS4 - Phase II Stormwater Education and Outreach Program, below please find information concerning rain gardens and the benefits they have on the environment. Residents and other interested parties may click the link below to learn more. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has created a “How-to” Manual for Homeowners which may answer many of the questions individuals have, including: Why are rain gardens important? Are they expensive? Do they require a lot of maintenance? Where should they be located?

 

A rain garden is a planted depression that allows rainwater runoff from impervious areas like roofs, driveways, walkways, parking lots, and compacted lawn areas the opportunity to be absorbed. This reduces rain runoff by allowing stormwater to soak into the ground (as opposed to flowing into storm drains and surface waters which can cause erosion, water pollution, flooding, and diminished groundwater). They can be designed for specific soils and climates. The purpose of a rain garden is to improve water quality in nearby bodies of water. Rain gardens can cut down on the amount of and rate of water and pollution reaching streams and other waterbodies. Compared to a conventional patch of lawn, a rain garden allows about

30% more water to soak into the ground.

 

Native plants are recommended for rain gardens because they generally do not require fertilizer and are more tolerant of one’s local climate, soil, and water conditions, and attract local wildlife such as native birds. The plants — a selection of wetland edge vegetation, such as wildflowers, sedges, rushes, ferns, shrubs and small trees — take up excess water flowing into the rain garden. Water filters through soil layers before entering the groundwater system.

 

http://dnr.wi.gov/org/water/wm/dsfm/shore/documents/rgmanual.pdf

 

 

 

Thank you,

 

Aaron Schmidt

Environmental Planner/Forestry Officer

ISA Certified Arborist NY-5607A

Department of Community

Development and Conservation

 

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