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Bicyclist injured in Edgemont on way to school (not serious injury)...bicycle tips
Release Date: May 01, 2014

 
A student was injured near the Edgemont High School this morning while riding a bicycle to school. I have asked the Chief to step up our bicycle safety initiatives. Fortunately, the student was not seriously injured. This is the Chief’s response. Our police will be reaching out to students and residents advising them of action steps they should be taking to reduce the chances of accidents.
PAUL FEINER
Supervisor Feiner,
I will coordinate with our Community Affairs Office and Traffic  and Safety Supervisor.  I am very sorry to hear that a child was struck and injured this morning.
I did get the facts related to the accident. While we will conduct enforcement in this area, speed was not a factor in today’s accident. The resident that was exited Glenwood Road onto Old Army Road did not see the bicyclist approaching the intersection and unfortunately struck him as she entered Old Army Road.
 I am in the process of putting together a bicycle safety memo that I will send out this afternoon.
 
Respectfully,
Chief Chris McNerney
After this put attachments
 
BICYCLE SAFETY TIPS
Greenburgh Police Department
188 Tarrytown Road
White Plains, NY 10607
Phone: (914) 682-5334 Fax: (914) 949-7116
Greenburgh Police
Crime Prevention Unit
 
On most roadways, bicyclists have the same rights and responsibilities as other roadway users and often share the same lane, but bicycles can be hard to see. The riders are exposed and easily injured in a collision. Oncoming bicycle traffic is often overlooked and its speed misjudged. Children riding bicycles create special problems for drivers because they are not capable of proper judgment in determining traffic conditions.
When passing a bicyclist proceeding in the same direction, do so slowly and leave at least a distance between you and the bicycle of no less than 3 feet. Maintain this clearance until you have safely passed the bicycle.
The most common causes of collisions are drivers turning left in front of an oncoming bicycle or turning right, across the path of the bicycle.
When your vehicle is turning left and there is a bicyclist entering the intersection from the opposite direction, you should wait for the bicyclist to pass before making the turn.
If your vehicle is turning right and a bicyclist is approaching on the right, let the bicyclist go through the intersection first before making a right turn. Remember to always use your turn signals.
Watch for bicycle riders turning in front of you without looking or signaling, especially if the rider is a child.
Take extra precautions in school zones and neighborhood areas where children and teenagers might be riding.
Watch out for bikes coming out of driveways or from behind parked cars or other obstructions.
Check side mirrors for bicyclists before opening the door.
For more information on Bicycle Safety contact:
P.O. Peter Dandreano
Crime Prevention Unit
Greenburgh Police Department
188 Tarrytown Road
White Plains, NY 10607
914-682-5334
 
 
Safe Riding Tips
Before riding, make sure you, your family, and the bicycles are ready to ride. Be a “Roll Model” for other adults and children.
Remember to:

  1. Wear a Bicycle Helmet. Everyone – at every age – should wear bicycle helmets. For more guidance on fitting a helmet, see the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Fitting Your Bike Helmet.
  2. Adjust Your Bicycle to Fit. Stand over your bicycle. There should be 1 to 2 inches between the rider and the top tube (bar) if using a road bike and 3 to 4 inches if using a mountain bike. The seat should be level front to back, and the height should be adjusted to allow a slight bend at the knee when the leg is fully extended. The handlebar height should be level with the seat.
  3. Check Your Equipment. Before riding, inflate tires properly and check that the brakes work.
  4. See and Be Seen. Whether daytime, dawn, dusk, bad weather, or at night, make yourself visible to others. Wear neon, fluorescent or other bright colors when riding, to be most easily seen. Wear something that reflects light, such as reflective tape or markings, or flashing lights. Remember, just because you can see a driver doesn’t mean the driver can see you.
  5. Control the Bicycle. Ride with two hands on the handlebars, except when signaling a turn. Place books and other items in a bicycle carrier or backpack.
  6. Watch for and Avoid Road Hazards. Look for hazards such as potholes, broken glass, gravel, puddles, leaves, and dogs. All these hazards can cause a crash.
  7. Use Verbal and Non-Verbal Communication. This includes eye contact with drivers, turn signals, pointing to road hazards for bicyclists behind you, and stating “passing on your left,” or “on your left.”
  8. Avoid Riding at Night. It’s hard for road users to see bicyclists at dusk, dawn, and nighttime. Use reflectors on the front and rear of your bicycle. White lights and red rear reflectors or lights are required by law in all States.
     
    Bicycling is fun, healthy, and a great family activity. But a bicycle isn’t a toy; it’s a vehicle!
    Some bike crashes can cause serious injuries and most are related to the behavior of you (the bicyclist) or the motorist. There are a number of things you can do to prevent a crash, and protect your brain if a crash occurs.
    Rules of the Road - Bicycling on the Road
    In all States, bicycles on the roadway are considered vehicles, and bicyclists are the drivers, with the same rights and responsibilities as motorists to follow the rules of the road. When riding, always:
  9. Go With the Traffic Flow. Ride on the right in the same direction as other vehicles. Go with the flow – not against it.
  10. Obey All Traffic Laws. A bicycle is a vehicle and you’re the driver. When you ride in the street, obey all traffic signs, signals, and lane markings.
  11. Yield to Traffic. Almost always, drivers on a smaller road must yield (wait) for traffic on a major or larger road. If there is no stop sign or traffic signal and you are coming from a smaller roadway (out of a driveway, from a sidewalk, a bike path, etc.), you must slow down and look to see if the way is clear before proceeding. Yield to pedestrians in a crosswalk.
  12. Be Predictable. Ride in a straight line, not in and out of cars. Signal your moves to others.
  13. Stay Alert at All Times. Use your eyes and ears. Watch out for potholes, cracks, wet leaves, storm grates, railroad tracks, or anything that could make you lose control of your bike. Listen for traffic and avoid dangerous situations; don’t use personal electronics when you ride.
  14. Look Before Turning. When turning left or right, always look behind you for a break in traffic, and then signal before making the turn. Watch for left- or right-turning traffic.
  15. Watch for Parked Cars. Ride far enough out from the curb to avoid the unexpected from parked cars (like doors opening, or cars pulling out).
     
    Where to Ride Safely
    1. Use bike lanes or bike paths, if available. While bicycles are allowed on many roads, riders may feel safer being separated from traffic. A lane or path is a safer choice than riding on a sidewalk.
    2. Riding on sidewalks puts you in a place where cars do not look for or expect to see moving traffic.
    3. Sidewalk riding puts you at risk for crashes at driveways and intersections.
    4.  
    5. Children younger than 10 years old are not consistently able to make the decisions necessary to safely ride unsupervised in the street. Therefore, they are safer riding away from traffic.
    6. For anyone riding on a sidewalk: Check the law in your State or jurisdiction to make sure sidewalk riding is allowed.
    7. Watch for vehicles coming out of or turning into driveways.
    8. Stop at corners of sidewalks and streets to look for cars and to make sure the drivers see you before crossing.
    9. Enter a street at a corner and not between parked cars. Alert pedestrians that you are nearby, saying, “Passing on your left,” or use a bell or horn.
    10.  
Prevent Bicycle Crashes:
Parents and Caregivers
 
A bicycle is not a toy.
It's a vehicle!
n More than one-fifth of all bicyclist deaths occur among school age youth ages 5 to 15. n More children go to hospital emergency departments for bicycle related crashes than for any other sport. n Although most deaths occur as a result of bicycle and motor vehicle crashes, crashes can happen anywhere—in parks, on bicycle paths, and in driveways.  Many crashes do not involve motor vehicles. n Head injuries are the most serious type of injury and the most common cause of death for bicyclists.  Bicycle helmets have been proven to reduce the risk of head and brain injury when a crash occurs by as much as 85 to 88 percent. n Children and adults should wear a bicycle helmet every time they ride a bicycle.
Children are NOT little adults.
Children:
n Do not naturally use their peripheral vision.  Children can be taught to use their peripheral vision when searching for traffic, however, children in grades K-3 are slower than older children and adults in identifying relevant objects in their peripheral vision.  n Do not automatically use sound to determine traffic location. Children automatically use their vision to identify traffic and do not typically think to use sounds as a strategy to determine where traffic is coming from.  n Are developing a sense of danger, but may frequently misunderstand the complexity of traffic situations. For instance, young schoolage children often classify a traffic situation as being safe if no cars are present and do not realize that crossing the street at a curve in the road is dangerous even if cars are not visible. n Are often restless, impatient, easily distracted and focused on the moment and/or themselves at the moment. They have trouble waiting for things like traffic lights or cars heading in their direction, lack impulse control and are present-oriented.  They do not understand the serious consequences their actions can have on their safety.
n Believe that grownups will look out for them.  n Think that if they can see themselves, then other people can see them too. Children often believe that as long as they are not hiding in or under something or hiding in the dark that people can see them. For instance, a child crossing the road on a hill will believe that he can be seen by others and not realize that a driver coming over the hill will see him when it is too late.
Prevent Bicycle Crashes:
Parents and Caregivers
Prevent Bicycle Crashes:
Parents and Caregivers
www.nhtsa.dot.gov
What Can You Do?
n Set a good example for children and think of your own safety as well as the safety of your child. Everyone should wear a bicycle helmet and ride safely. For more information see the National
Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) publication: “Easy Steps for Fitting a Bicycle
Helmet” at: http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/
injury/pedbimot/bike/EasyStepsWeb/index.htm
In Spanish at: http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/
injury/pedbimot/bike/EasyStepsSpan/index.
htm
n Check with your driver licensing agency and highway department for booklets that explain State or local bicycle safety rules. For more information see NHTSA publication: “Kids and Bicycle Safety”at: (http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/pedbimot/bike/KidsandBikeSafetyWeb/
index.htm), also available in Spanish.  n Help your child become a better and safer cyclist.
Enroll you and/or your child in a bicycle safety education program to gain more on-bicycle skill
training. Look for programs in your school, community recreation centers, local or State bicycle coalitions, or through the League of American Bicyclists at www.bikeleague.org. n Observe and consider the uniqueness of your child when teaching bicycle safety.
? Establish your rules of where and when your child can bicycle, based on your child’s abilities and limitations. Children of the same age may require different levels of supervision.
? Apply your observations of your child’s behavior out of traffic. Is your child impulsive or a risk
taker? Does your child act before thinking or have trouble switching attention to something important? It is likely your child’s behavior in traffic will resemble behavior out of traffic. n Check your child’s bicycle for correct fit, properly working parts, and reflectors. n Most bicycle crashes are due to falls. Teach children in your care to: tie their shoe laces so they don’t get caught in the chain, look for and avoid hazards on the ground (toys, pebbles, potholes, etc), and to keep both hands on the handlebars.  Teach your child to look left-right-left before entering the roadway or intersection. n Avoid riding at night, as drivers often miss seeing cyclists. If riding at night or in low light conditions is unavoidable, make sure you and the child in your care are visible by wearing bright colored clothing, reflective gear and white head lights plus red rear reflectors.  n Never allow a child to ride a bicycle while listening to audio headphones; they obstruct their ability to hear and pay attention to traffic.  n Teach defensive riding including always looking out for others; many drivers do not look for bicyclists. n Children nine years of age and younger, are not able to identify and adjust to many dangerous traffic situations, and therefore, should not be allowed to ride in the street unsupervised. Children who are permitted to ride in the street without supervision should have the necessary skills to safely follow the “rules of the road.”  n Teach children to use proper hand signals to let other road users know their intentions.
www.nhtsa.dot.gov
 
Common Types Of Collisions
Between Bicyclists & Motorists
DOT HS 810 000
April 2007
 
 
Bicyclist Comes From Alley or Driveway  Often called a “midblock rideout,” this is the most frequent crash type for young riders and occurs soon after the bicyclist enters the roadway from a driveway, alley, or curb without slowing, stopping, or looking for traffic. The bicyclist’s sudden entry leaves the motorist too little time to avoid a collision.
Always stop and look. Look left-right-left for traffic before entering a roadway.
Bicyclist is Riding the Wrong Way  Motorists do not expect traffic to be approaching from the wrong direction.
This creates a situation for a crash, which is the main reason why it is unlawful to ride facing traffic.
Go with the flow.  Always ride on the right side of the road, with traffic, just like cars do. It’s the law.
Motorist Overtaking (Passing a Bicyclist) This type of crash occurs because the motorist fails to see and react to the bicyclist until it is too late. This type is more frequent at night, on narrow rural roads and often involves driver inattention and/or impaired driving.
Avoid riding at night. Avoid dark conditions, narrow roads, and roads with highway speeds over 35 mph. Use
white front lights, red rear reflectors or lights, and special retro-reflective clothing if you must ride at night.
Bicyclist Makes Left Turn or Suddenly Swerves  The bicyclist swerves to the left without checking traffic or without signaling and moves into the path of an overtaking vehicle. The motorist does not have time to avoid a collision.
Be predictable. Always ride in a straight line. When preparing to change your lane position, look behind you and yield to overtaking traffic. When making a turn, use the proper hand signal.
Failure to Obey Stop Signs  Also called “stop sign rideout,” this crash occurs when the bicyclist enters an
intersection that is controlled by a traffic signal and collides with a motor vehicle approaching from an uncontrolled lane.  The bicyclist fails to stop or slow before entering the intersection. This dangerous action does not give the motorist enough time to avoid a collision
Obey all traffic signals and signs.  Watch for traffic signals. Walk your bicycle across busy intersections.
For more information on bicycle safety, visit the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) Web
site at: www.nhtsa.dot.gov
 
Safe Riding Tips
Before riding, make sure you and your bike are ready to ride. You can be a “Roll Model” for your peers and younger kids.
Remember to:
  1. Wear a Bike Helmet. Protect your brain, save your life. For more information see the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Fitting Your Bike Helmet.
  2. Adjust Your Bike to Fit. Stand over your bike. There should be 1 to 2 inches between the rider and the top tube (bar) if using a road bike and 3 to 4 inches if using a mountain bicycle. The seat should be level front to back, and the height should be adjusted to allow a slight bend at the knee when the leg is fully extended. The handlebar height should be at the same level with the seat.
  3. Check Your Equipment. Before riding, inflate tires properly and check that the brakes work.
  4. See and Be Seen. Whether daytime, dawn, dusk, foul weather, or at night. Wear neon, fluorescent or other bright colors when riding, to make yourselves the most visible to others. Also wear something that reflects light, such as reflective tape or markings, or flashing lights. Remember, just because you can see a driver doesn’t mean the driver can see you.
  5. Control Your Bike. Ride with two hands on the handlebars unless signaling a turn. Place books and other items in a bike carrier or backpack.
  6. Watch for and Avoid Road Hazards. Look for hazards that may make you crash, such as potholes, broken glass, gravel, puddles, leaves, and dogs. If riding in a group, the rider in front should yell and point to hazards to alert other riders.
  7. Avoid Riding at Night. It’s harder for other road users to see bicyclists at dusk, dawn or nighttime. Use reflectors on the front and rear of the bike. White lights and red rear reflectors or lights are required by law in all States.
     
    Many bike-related crashes resulting in injury or death are associated with your behavior as a bicyclist, and some of them are in your control. First, while it doesn’t prevent a crash, a bike helmet worn correctly can prevent injury to your brain if you crash; a helmet could save your life. By paying attention, and knowing and following some basic rules of the road, you can avoid some crashes completely.
    Biking is fun, healthy, and a great way to get around and be independent. But your bike is a vehicle, not a toy! So DRIVE your bicycle and follow these tips.
    Rules for Biking on the Road
    In all States, bikes on the roadway are considered vehicles, and bicyclists are the drivers of those vehicles, with the same rights and responsibilities as other motorists to follow the rules of the road, including:
  8. Go With the Traffic Flow. Ride on the right side in the same direction as other vehicles. Go with the flow – not against it.
  9. Obey All Traffic Laws. As the driver of your vehicle on the road, obey all traffic signs, signals, and lane markings.
  10. Yield to Traffic. Almost always, drivers on a smaller road must yield (wait) for traffic on a major or larger road. If there is no stop sign or traffic signal and you are coming from a smaller roadway (out of a driveway, from a sidewalk, a bike path, etc.), slow down, look for traffic, and go only when it’s clear. Also yield to pedestrians in a crosswalk.
  11. Be Predictable. Ride in a straight line, not in and out of cars. Signal your moves to others.
  12. Stay Alert at All Times. Use your eyes AND ears. Look for potholes, cracks, wet leaves, storm grates, railroad tracks, or anything that could make you lose control of your bike. Listen for traffic and avoid dangerous situations; don’t use personal electronic devices when you ride.
  13. Look Before Turning. When turning left or right, always look behind you for a break in traffic, and then signal before making the turn. Watch for left- or right-turning traffic.
  14. Watch for Parked Cars. Ride far enough out from the curb to avoid the unexpected from parked cars (like doors opening, or cars pulling out).
     
    Sidewalk versus Street Riding
    The safest place for riding a bike is on the street, where bikes are expected to follow the same rules of the road and ride in the same direction as motorists. Sidewalks are designed for slower moving traffic like pedestrians.
  15. If you don’t know the rules of the road, or your parents feel like you aren’t ready to ride on the street, avoid riding your bike near traffic altogether.
    1. For anyone riding on a sidewalk: Check the law in your State or jurisdiction to make sure sidewalk riding is allowed.
    2. Watch for vehicles coming out of or turning into driveways.
    3. Stop at corners of sidewalks and streets to look for cars and to make sure the drivers see you before crossing.
    4. Enter a street at a corner and not between parked cars. Alert pedestrians that you are nearby, saying, “Passing on your left,” or use a bell or horn
    5.  
       
       
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